Author Topic: Verroa Mite Life cycle  (Read 59 times)

Offline LCBKAadmin

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Verroa Mite Life cycle
« on: September 01, 2016, 04:28:50 AM »
Life cycle
The adult female mites commonly seen within the hive and on the bees have flat, reddish-brown oval bodies, greater in width than length (1.6 x 1.1mm). The female mites enters an open cell, just before the cell is about to be capped where it will hide in the brood food situated under the larva. There it will wait for 2-3 days, breathing from a respiratory organ known as a peritreme. Once the food has been consumed by the larva, the female mite will begin reproduction inside the sealed cell, laying her first egg (generally male) and later, in intervals of around 1-2 days, the female will continue to lay up to seven eggs which are usually female mites. These hatch into immature mites of which only two to three reach adult stages.

While inside the cell, the mites will feed on the developing pupae, tranferring viruses which can shorten the life span and stunt the pupa’s development. After 21 days, the worker bee emerges (24 for male drones) along with any surviving mites which attach themselves to the bee’s dorsum until they reach a new open cell with a larva in it.

As well as natural reproduction, mite populations are also increased between colonies through robbing, drifting and swarming. A severe build up of mites in a colony will lead to visual symptoms of Varroosis
“True patriotism hates injustice in its own land more than anywhere else.”
~Clarence Darrow

Offline LCBKAadmin

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Re: Verroa Mite Life cycle
« Reply #1 on: September 15, 2016, 12:58:04 PM »
Varroa mite on the back of a bee.  >:(
“True patriotism hates injustice in its own land more than anywhere else.”
~Clarence Darrow